Change Your Vision – Part 2

For those of you who have been following my blog -firstly thank you it really means the world to know that people are reading my content and see fit to leave some really nice feedback. For those of you who haven’t – why not? I’m knocking out some good stuff here!!

Anyway  – some of you may remember that last week I wrote about how great it would be if we could start to see the world through a child’s eyes, to think without prejudice and to question when we see something wrong.

Change Your Vision

Today I want to talk about children who don’t get to be children and have a childhood. I recently learnt that there are 160 million children forced into slavery. That figure blew my mind, 160 million children who don’t get to play, who don’t get to learn, who don’t get to dream about what they want to be when they grow up. Children who are trafficked into slavery where they get physically and sexually abused. These children might be making the clothes we wear. They might be making toys, games, footballs etc for other children but never get to play themselves.

I don’t want to bring the mood down too much because there are people who are doing amazing things and there are little things that we can all do.

An amazing man called Kailash Satyarthi has dedicated his life to eradicating child slavery and to make sure that every child is free, safe healthy and educated. He has already freed an amazing 80,000 children from a life of slavery. Children who can get on with having a childhood and learn to dream and play.

Last month a film was released on YouTube – The Price of Free. It features the life and work of Kailash and shows some of the operations that have been carried out to free child slaves. To be honest  – I haven’t got round to watching it yet! I will do over the holidays. So that’s one thing we can do. Watch this film, share with friends and raise awareness. I know some of you write some fantastic film review. Why not promote this?

The Price of Free

Another is to be more mindful about how we shop. How do we know that the clothes we wear, the toys our children play with haven’t been made by a child kept in slavery? One way would be to email, tweet the CEO’s of our favourite brands and seek reassurances. If our products can show that they haven’t been tested on animals is it too much to ask companies to display their guarantee that they haven’t used child labour?

The third way is the usual way, to donate what you can to one of the causes that are trying to end child slavery. What I love about Kailash is that he reminds us that we all have the love and compassion to bring about change and we can all do a bit no matter how small.

Thank You

Change Your Vision

For today’s blog I want you to come back in time with me – cue dream like music and wavy filters!

I want you to picture yourself in primary school between the ages of about 5-8. I have to go back a lot further in time than most of you!                                                          

Now – think of your friends. How did you choose your closest friends? Was it based on where they lived, what clothes they wore – the colour of their skin? Or was it based on how they behaved towards you and others?

If somebody joined your class who was from another country or another culture, how did you react? With fear, with suspicion, with judgement? Or with curiosity, with a load of questions that you wanted to ask, with excitement, with a desire to get to know this new person and be the first to include them in your group.

Did somebody in your class have a disability? Were they in a wheelchair, or struggle with communication? What happened? Were they left to get on with it or did you look for ways to include them? Did you adapt so you could fit in with their world? Did you get excited by learning a new way to communicate?

If somebody in your class was hungry and didn’t have their dinner how did you react? Just leave them, or did you look at your lunchbox and realise that you had more than enough and could spare something? Then did you tell someone that your classmate did not have any food with them?

If one of your best friends was feeling sad what did you do? Did you tell them to get over it, or did you try and make them feel better and if they were still feeling sad did you go and tell someone so you could get some more help so your friend started to feel better?

Ok by now I’m sure you know where I’m going with this. Seriously, what happens to us as we leave our childhood? Why do we turn to suspicion, why do we start to judge people based on anything other than how they behave towards us. Why do we look for reasons to exclude rather than include. Why do we stop questioning and just accept? What happens to compassion?

I have my own theory. As children we put our trust in authority, in grown-ups. We believe that people with knowledge and power tell us the truth and have our best interests. Our lives become harder and more stressful. The papers will come up with reasons why our lives aren’t perfect, the politicians will tell us it’s nothing to do with them, it’s always the other lot. We’re conditioned to become fearful, to be suspicious, to look for evidence to reinforce views that we’ve been fed. We’re told to look after No1.

But wouldn’t it be great to start seeing the world through the eyes of a young child again? To question, to use our eyes and our ears to see the world around us. We’re coming up to Christmas, one of the most magical times for most children. Let’s embrace that joy and wonder. Find your compassion x